Category Archives: Probiotics

Insane Medicine – Dietary Review!

I wanted to generalize some overall health information in this particular blog and incorporate items that are important for increasing successful strategies for aging and maintaining your health.

  • Remember that circulation is important in your body because it provides energy and sustains life in the various tissues. Regular exercise is a way to keep your body maximally conditioned. Your circulation delvers oxygen and nutrients to your body and at the same time allows toxins to be removed as it passes through the liver, kidney, and lymph systems. So be certain to keep moving and exercise to maximize your health.
  • Eat more plant foods. As a result of doing this, you take in less fat and will increase your fiber intake. This allows more protecting antioxidants to be incorporated into your body. Ingesting more fiber allows for better waste removal, and less fat intake results in a decreased tendency for your blood to thicken and clot, thus decreasing cardiovascular risk. The large amount of protecting agents in plant-based diets results in less inflammation in the body and less cellular damage.
  • Choose plant foods with strong flavors and with bright colors. Have a healthy fat focus in your diet. Chose your beverages you drink wisely, in other words, stop drinking sodas! Try your best to allow your stomach to be empty  and have ‘hunger pains’ for at least two thirty minute periods each day.
  • Remember that the body evolved in a world where salt, sugar, and fat were scarce and are like addictive drugs. Be careful to avoid choosing processed foods when possible and not adding salt and sugar to your meals. Avoid sodas ( which are high in sugar content)! Even noncaloric beverages may be increasing our desire for sweet food and spurring increasing rates of obesity.
  • Fructose in our foods has been a source of increasing weight gain in our society. Fructose and glucose (both sugars) have a differential effect on the brain. Glucose will reduce activation of brain regions that are involved in appetite, motivation, and reward and will increase our sense of satiety and decrease our food seeking behavior. Fructose does not do this. It is sweet, but it makes us want more! Corn sweeteners (fructose) have correlated with rising obesity.
  • Plant-based foods give us phytochemicals which act as protectors. Plant-based foods give smell, taste, and fragrance to our diet. They have an antioxidant effect. Kale, cabbage, broccoli, and  arugula have a sulfur based mustard taste that increase detoxification enzymes in the body. You should get 5-9 servings of colorful, flavorful vegetables in your diet each day – five servings for smaller people and at least nine servings if you are a big person. How much is a serving for vegetables? One-half cup cut up is equal to a serving, in general, for vegetables (for raw spinach, a whole cup is equal to a serving)
  • So again – look for colorful vegetables, as they have higher levels of phytochemicals in them, For example, zucchini has a green outside but mostly colorless interior, and therefore is a poorer choice of a vegetable. Instead, go for the carrots, spinach, broccoli, and yellow squash as options, since they have more color to them and therefore more protective phytonutrients! You will find higher levels of Vitamin A in deep orange vegetables such as carrots. The carotenoids and retinol in these vegetables impart the orange coloring and give the protective qualities of these vegetables.  Cruciferous vegetables have a big, strong flavor with sulfur components. They have powerful antioxidants in them and include arugula, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, kale, kholorabi, radish, rutabaga, and turnips. Citrus fruits are high in Vitamin C, which helps fight infection. They also have an antihistamine/anti-allergic effect as well as anti-oxidant effect, which protects cell membranes and DNA in the body from oxidative damage. Vitamin C is important in the production of collagen component of connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments.
  • Eating up to nine servings a day of vegetables was associated with 24% less obesity in one study. Why? Because you eat less of other fatty foods.
  • Fiber rich foods  are very important in the diet. Vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains are all rich sources of protective nutrients and phytochemicals and have a lower glycemic load as well. Eating foods with high fiber content results in less obesity since people who consume high-fiber foods feel more full. Likewise, higher fiber meals cause increase transit through the gut and decrease carcinogen exposure. This results in less colon cancer risk! Soluble fiber decreases cholesterol levels while fibrous food will increase the amount of protective gut bacteria.
  • We will be discussing the gut biome over time in this blog. Your gut has a population of bacteria that live and thrive but also help us maintain homeostasis. Alterations in the gut biome (bacterial population) can result in inflammation and disease. Immune compromise can occur if the gut biome is altered or destroyed. It turns out that soluble fiber is a food source for these necessary gut bacteria to remain healthy, and hence us as well.
  • We need 25 grams of fiber every day. A rule of thumb is one gets 2 grams of fiber per vegetable/fruit serving, so 5 servings of vegetables equals 10 gm of fiber.
  • Whole grains are a good source of fiber. One slice of whole grain bread is equal to a serving. A cup of cooked oatmeal is considered a serving. A thought for increasing fiber content is to use wheat berries, which cook like brown rice. Adding sunflowers to them can make a nutritious bundle.
    Wheat berries cook like brown rice and taste great when mixed with sunflower seeds!
    Wheat berries cook like brown rice and taste great when mixed with sunflower seeds!

    Cooked beans, peas , and lentils have 6 gm of fiber per half-cup of cooked item. They are excellent sources of fiber.

    Consider adding mung beans, which are bean sprouts that cook like lentils, in a dish with some olive oil, salt, and pepper and placing it over pasta.
    Consider adding mung beans, which are bean sprouts that cook like lentils, in a dish with some olive oil, salt, and pepper and placing it over pasta.

     

  • Always be certain that you check to see if a bread item is whole grain. Check the ingredient list. You want whole, sprouted, or malted wheat or whole grain on the label. Beware if it says wheat flour, for that is the same as white flour.
  • Put as many vegetables on your salad as possible. Lettuce has very little fiber.
  • Be certain to take in 5-10 grams a day of soluble fiber out of the 25-35 grams of fiber that is needed. Soluble fiber lowers cholesterol levels and feeds the healthy gut bacteria to support our immune system. An orange (medium) has 3-5 grams of soluble fiber, while a half cup of beans has 3-5 grams. Two tablespoons of ground flaxseed has 1.5 grams of soluble fiber. Flaxseed can be ground into flaxmeal.
  • Of note, a high fiber diet provides a low glycemic load, which is great for diabetics, but particle size of the fiber source is important. For example, old fashioned or scottish oats are best for fiber sources, whereas smaller particle sized grain products lose the fiber benefits. It turns out the glycemic index is higher in small-particles of grains (they get absorbed easier).
  • Higher glycemic-load foods are associated with chronic diseases. As people absorb more carbohydrates and gain weight, their insulin level increases in response, which promotes increased fat storage, thereby leading to the need for more insulin to control blood  sugar. This results in diabetes over time. Also cancer is more common in obese individuals as insulin-like growth factor (IL-GF) drives cancer growth. IL-GF is involved in glucose metabolism. A diet with a low glycemic load would include non-starchy vegetables except potatoes. Whole grains are high in glycemic load and make diabetes more difficult to contol. Pasta, rice, potato, and virus have high glycemic loads and are not as healthy. Fruit has high fiber content and a LOW glycemic index. High fat foods also have lower glycemic load. So aim for foods with lower glycemic indices as they allow for better body sugar control.
  • Fats affect inflammation in the body. High body fat content, especially abdominal fat,  is linked to cancer risk, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and autoimmune disorders. In an anti-inflammatory diet, one wants to avoid excess fat.  Decrease your fatty food intake, especially fried foods and fast foods. Decrease your dressings and mayonnaise on your foods. Decrease the amount of sweets in your diet, especially cookies and cake. Eat more fish and seafood (not fried) at least 2-3 times a week, except for farmed salmon, which should be eaten only once a month. Avoid sweetened beverages and limit foods with sweeteners. Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans.
    Beans are good!
    Beans are good!

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    Use extra virgin olive oil to toss in your vegetable or salad to allow easier coating of the leaves with your favorite dressing. By doing that, you will use less dressing and spread it out evenly!
    Use extra virgin olive oil to toss in your vegetable or salad to allow easier coating of the leaves with your favorite dressing. By doing that, you will use less dressing and spread it out evenly! Less dressing=Less fat!

     

  • Fat balance is important in your diet. Avoid the pro inflammatory fats, such as omega-6 polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) such as corn, cottonseed, soy, safflower, and sunflower oils, which are high in omega-6 oils. decrease your meat intake and decrease fish intake that are fed these products such as farm-grown salmon! Omega-3 PUFA are anti-inflammatory. and are present in flaxseed oil. Also, pasture-fed livestock (‘grass-fed’) have less omega-6 fatty acid in them. Avoid livestock that are fed grain or corn at any time, since that increases the amount of proinflammatoy PUFA in them. ‘Grass finished’ livestock means that the livestock ate grass until they are butchered. Choose grass-fed products only!
  • Some fat-health guidelines include avoiding fat soluble contaminants by eating food items lower on the food chain, such as smaller animals (fish) and avoiding farmed salmon. Eat only organic products. Avoid saturated fats, present in processed foods and dairy products or red meat. Avoid rancid fats by limiting aged cheese and meat (deli meat) in your diet. Chose healthy fats, which increase satiety and help absorb fat soluble vitamins. Healthy fats include avocados, olive oil, sardines, nuts, seeds, and olives.  Larger animals have more time to get contaminants in them. Chicken and sardines, which are lower on the food chain, live short lives. low in the food chain, and accumulate less toxins. Don’t eat fats that are solid at room temperature,. Avoid processed foods and meats (deli meats)
  • Rancid fats add oxidative stress to your body.Increase your monounsaturated fat intake such as avocado and olive oil, which are heart-healthy.  It was found that people who eat less saturated fat and more monounsaturated fats in their diet have better cognitive performance and verbal memory over time!
  • Osteoporosis prevention: Increase the following: exercise, calcium intake, vitamin D, protein and potassium . They all help build healthy bones! Protein is needed to build the bony matrix. Avoid caffeine (>300 mg a day) and avoid smoking and excessive sodium intake. Avoid being too thin. These factors all impact bone health in negative ways. Excessive sodium in the diet causes the kidneys to waste calcium in the urine. Be certain to get 1200 mg of calcium a day in the diet. For example, 1 or 2% no-fat milk has 300 mg of calcium per cup, while yogurt has 250 mg in 6 ounces. Please note that not all tofu has enough calcium in it, so check the labels. Also, corn tortillas (traditional mad with lime) has calcium in it ( fiver per day provides a lot of calcium)
  • Calcium bioavailability in the diet depends on the source of the calcium. There is calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, calcium malate, calcium phosphate, calcium gluconate, and calcium lactate. Tums has calcium carbonate in it and excessive use can decrease digestive enzymes and increase bloating gas production as a result, so avoid excessive tums. Avoid calcium from dolomite, bonemeal, and oyster shells (they have lead contaminants in them). Calcium mixed with Vitamin D and magnesium is an excellent supplement for bone health, especially as a 2:1 ratio (calcium 500mg/magnesium 250 mg). People absorb calcium better in small quantities through the day rather than a single large bolus. Be aware that calcium interacts with many medications and interferes with absorption of some medications, such as tetracyclines, biphosphonates, aspirin, and others. Some medications deplete calcium, such as aluminum antacids, steroids, anticonvulsannts, which deplete calcium supplies in the body. Calcium mixed with thiazide diuretics can lead to high, toxic blood levels of calcium in some people. Of note, a study recently suggested that calcium supplements may increase the risk of heart disease in some people by depositing in the coronary vessels. This appears to be not true.
  • Vitamin D is also an important component to bone health and body health. Deficiency in this vitamin has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune disorders, stroke, and musculoskeletal decline, among other things. Optimally, blood levels should be 30-80 ng/ml. The RDA for vitamin D in people aged 50-71 is 400 IU/day and for those over 70, the RDA is 600 IU/day. You can take up to 4000 IU/day safely per some sources. Vitamin D3 is the most active form of Vitamin D. Vitamin D is neccessary for optimal calcium and magnesium absorption in the gut. Our western style diet results in a high acid intake that leaches our bones. Chronic low grade acidosis in the body with our acidic diet, leads to bone derangement, especially in people with poor kidney function.
  • The shift to eating a better acid-base balanced diet can be made by including more plat foods in your diet (they are rich in alkaline materials). Consider this to boost bone health.
  • The recommended intake of protein is .4-.6 gm of protein per pound of weight. The average protein intake should be 55-100 gm per day. Protein content is high in beans, peas, and lentils (7 gm in a half cup) and high in poultry, fich, and lean meat (7 gm in 10 oz meat). Consider eating nuts and seeds for protein supplementation ( 7 gm in  1/4 cup, especially pumpkin seeds, which have 18 gms!)

Insane Medicine – Probiotics for inflammation, gut health, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and many other things!!

Insane Medicine - probiotics help!
Insane Medicine – probiotics help!
  • The symbiotic organisms found in the gut and elsewhere are called “probiotics.” These organisms help metabolize foods, absorb nutrients, prevent pathogenic colonization, and  help maintain intestinal health by living within our gut and competing with other unhelpful bacteria.
  • Some foods have probiotics added in them, such as: yogurt, kefir, kombucha tea, cheese, buttermilk, fermented cabbage like sauerkraut, and kimchi,  and acidophilus milk.
  • Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacteria species, and Saccharomyces boulardii are the most commonly used probiotic species used. Lesser probiotics include Streptococcus thermophilus 
  • Processed foods do not have live probiotic organisms. The processing kiolls the organisms. Look for labels that say “contains live active cultures.”
  • Probiotics work by competing with the growth of harmful bacteria in the gut by taking up space and nutrients. Siome produce antibacterial substances, such as hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, or lactic acid, that prevents bacterial growth.
  • Probiotics appear to be immunomodulators,  stimulating lymphocyte and macrophage activity, reducing markers of intestinal inflammation such as tumor necrosis factor and alpha-1-antitrypsin. They can increase the secretion of immunoglobulin A in the gut against harmful bacteria.
  • Probiotics not only fight intestinal and urogenital pathogens, but they also are helpful for several conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease,  food allergy, pouchitis,  and as an adjuvant to vaccination.
  • Remember to use only proven blends of probiotics. Not all brands of probiotics are equivalent, even if they have the same agents in them!
  • Primary uses of Probiotics include uses for Antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium dificile infections, irritable bowel syndrome, and preventing respiratory infections.
  • The use of a probiotic with antibiotics can reduce diarrhea by 45 % or so.  Lactobacillus has the best evidence for success, with  Florajen ( Lactobacillus acidophilus) being very effective. Lactobacillus plantarum299v (ProViva) is also useful.
  • Bifidobacteriuminfantus and Bifidobacterium longus are effective as is Saccharomyces boulardii for reducing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.
  • Combination products such as Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium BB12 (AB-Yogurt), Bifidobacterium lactis plus Streptococcus thermophilus (Nan 2), and  Lactobacillus bulgaricus plus Streptococcus thermophilus plus Lactobacillus casei DN114401 (DanActive, Actimel) are also effective, reducing diarrhea by 40%.
  • Probiotics are also helpful for reducing the risk of Clostridium difficile infection in patients taking antibiotics. The combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285 plus Lactobacillus casei (Bio-K+Cl1285 is effective in reducing C. dificile infection when taking antibiotics by over 80 %.
  • Lactobacillus planarium299v (ProViva) can reduce recurrence of C. dificile infections. Saccaromyces boulardii(Florastor) also can reduce C. dificile infections by over 60%.
  • Combination products include Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus (VSL#3) and DanActive/Actimel (Lactobacillus bulgaricus plusStreptococcus thermophilus plus Lactobacillus casei)
  • For irritable Bowel syndrome, Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 (Align or Bifantis Procter & Gamble) works well, decreasing abdominal complaints. The product, VSL#3, works well in decreasing IBS symptoms.
  • Probiotics also decrease respiratory infections by 30 % or more. Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Streptococcus thermophilus are helpful in various combinations.
  • Avoid or be careful with probiotics if you are immunocompromised. Ask your doctor first before using them in that case.

Products you can use include:

  • Activia yogurt (Dannon –Bifidobacterium lactis), Align (Proctor and Gamble -Bifidobacterium infantis) for digestive health and antibiotic induced diarrhea.
  • Culturelle (ConAgra Foods – Lactobacillus GG) with multiple varieties,  It helps with digestion and decreases bloating sensation.
  • Danactive, with a mixture of probiotics in it, for antibiotic associated diarrhea.
  • Fllorajen (Lactobacillus acidophilus) with many varieties, useful for antibiotic-associated diarrhea and bowel health.
  • VSL#3(Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals – Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. paracasei, L. bulgaricus, Bifidobacterium breve, B. infantis, B. longum, and Streptococcus thermophilus mixture) useful in inflammatory bbowel disorders and puchitis.
  • Fem-dophilus- Lactobacillus rhamnosus, for urinary health, preventing bacterial vaginosis and promoting vaginal health.
  • Probabclac and Lactinex are other agents used as probiotics with efficacy.

http://activia.us.com/  <—Activia probiotic

http://www.culturelle.com/culturelle-advantage?gclid=CJnP-YK9ocECFXLl7AodXm4AyQ  <—Culturelle

http://www.dannon.com/danactive/  <– Danactive

http://www.insyncprobiotic.com/?gclid=CNuBzaG9ocECFcNQ7AoduScA3A <–Probalac probiotic

http://www.jamiesonvitamins.com/5136  < –Jamieson probiotic sticks

http://www.florastor.com/  <–Florastor probiotics

http://www.vsl3.com/   <—vsl#3 probiotic