Tag Archives: depression

A little smile may make you less depressed – Botox and depression treatment

treatment-of-depression-with-onabotulinumtoxina-a-randomized-trial-2013

Summary:

Converging lines of evidence suggest a role for facial expressions in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. To determine the antidepressant effect of onabotulinumtoxinA (OBA) treatment of corrugator and procerus muscles in people with major depressive disorder, we conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. In an outpatient clinical research center, eighty-five subjects with DSM-IV major depression were randomized to receive either OBA (29 units for females and 40 units for males) or saline injections into corrugator and procerus frown muscles (74 subjects were entered into the analysis). Subjects were rated at screening, and 3 and 6 weeks after OBA treatment. The primary outcome measure was the response rate, as defined by ! 50% decrease in score on the MontgomeryeAsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Response rates at 6 weeks from the date of injection were 52% and 15% in the OBA and placebo groups, respectively (Chi-Square (1) ¼ 11.2, p < 0.001, Fisher p < 0.001). The secondary outcome measure of remission rate (MADRS score of 10 or less) was 27% with OBA and 7% with placebo (Chi-square (1) ¼ 5.1, p < 0.02, Fisher p < 0.03). Six weeks after a single treatment, MADRS scores of subjects were reduced on average by 47% in those given OBA, and by 21% in those given placebo (ManneWhitney U, p < 0.0005). In conclusion, a single treatment with OBA to the corrugator and procerus muscles appears to induce a significant and sustained antidepressant effect in patients with major depression.

emotional-proprioception-treatment-of-depression-with-afferent-facial-feedback

We develop the concept of emotional proprioception, whereby the muscles of facial expression play a central role in encoding and transmitting information to the brain’s emotional circuitry, and describe its underlying neuroanatomy. We explore the role of facial expression in both reflecting and influencing depressed mood. The circuitry involved in this latter effect is a logical target for treatment with botulinum toxin, and we review the evidence in support of this strategy. Clinical trial data suggest that botulinum toxin is effective in treating depression. We discuss the clinical and theoretical implications of these data. This novel treatment approach is just one example of the potential importance of the cranial nerves in the treatment of depression.

prospective-analysis-of-the-use-of-onabotulinumtoxina-botox-in-the-treatment-of-chronic-migraine

Background:

Chronic migraine affects 2% of the population. It results in substantial disability and reduced quality of life. Medications used for prophylaxis in episodic migraine may also work in chronic migraine. The efficacy and safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) in adults with chronic migraine was confirmed in the PREEMPT programme. However, there are few real-life data of its use.

Method: 254 adults with chronic migraine were injected with OnabotulinumtoxinA BOTOX as per PREEMPT Protocol between July 2010 and May 2013, their headache data were collected using the Hull headache diary and analysed to look for headache, migraine days decrements, crystal clear days increment in the month post treatment, we looked at the 50% responder rate as well.

Results: Our prospective analysis shows that OnabotulinumtoxinA, significantly, reduced the number of headache and migraine days, and increased the number of headache free days. OnabotulinumtoxinA Botox also improved patients’ quality of life. We believe that these results represent the largest post-marketing cohort of patients treated with OnabotulinumtoxinA in the real-life clinical setting.

 Conclusion: OnabotulinumtoxinA is a valuable addition to current treatment options in patients with chronic migraine. Our results support findings of PREEMPT study in a large cohort of patients, we believe, is representative of the patients seen in an average tertiary headache centre. While it can be used as a first line prophylaxis its cost may restrict its use to more refractory patients who failed three oral preventive treatments

http://www.botoxfordepression.com/ < Website promoting botox use for depression

 

Insane Medicine – Inflammation as a cause of psychiatric conditions!

 

 

 

 

Clustering of Depression and Inflammation in Adolescents Previously Exposed to Childhood Adversity

http://www.sobp.org/files/public/BPS%20Press%20Release_Miller%20and%20Cole_FINAL.pdf   <<< Childhood Adversity Increases Risk for Depression and Chronic Inflammation

Insane Medicine – Cardiac Rehabilitation will save your life

Cardiac rehab and healthy eating save lives
Cardiac rehab and healthy eating save lives!

eat healthy

  • Have you had a heart attack? Then why aren’t you in cardiac rehab if your doctor says it’s okay?
  • Those who are involved in cardiac rehab have a 47 % decrease in heart attack risk over the next two years! Also, those who participate have fewer hospital admissions and live longer.
  • Cardiac rehab is an option post-heart attack, as well as for those with arrhythmias and heart failure. It is associated with decreased mortality and prolonged survival.
  • Cardiac Rehab is coached by trained professionals who teach you how to appropriately exercise based on your capabilities and prescription. This improves your functional status.
  • It also involves nutritional counseling, teaching the patient to eat a low fat and sodium diet to help manage cholesterol levels and blood pressure. This allows you to maintain a healthy weight.
  • cardiac rehab also helps you maintain a regimen. More important, one must take their prescribed medications for optimal outcomes. Compliance leads to success. Education about medications that are important is a key  factor.
  • Cardiac rehab also educates one to avoid unhealthy habits, such as smoking and maintaining diet. likewise, the mental aspect of a post-cardiac condition is crucial in maximizing outcomes. Depression and other mental disorders must be fully addressed and treated.
  • Exercise creates stronger muscles and improved cardiovascular fitness that improves ones emotional state as well. Cardiac rehab must be continued in the home environment for maximal impact.
  • The journal BMJ showed that even a little bit of exercise provides noticeable benefits of health. the goal is 150 minutes of exercise per week, but even small amounts of physical activity may decrease the mortality risk.
  • Exercise helps with depression and boosts your natural endorphins that make you feel better, resulting in increased energy levels. Exercise allows you to take control of your life and is a mood enhancer that gives you an overall sense of well-being.
  • Depression and anxiety can be blunted by such exercise programs, especially when they are maintained at home as well. Meditation and behavior modification are key components to creating a healthy lifestyle. People who are depressed and feel hopeless have a higher rate of dying from their cardiac disease. exercise at least 30 minutes a day, working your way up to that amount even if you don’t have the internal motivation to do so.

Insane Medicine – Lowering Dementia Risk

Dementia
Dementia

Research is demonstrating that treating multiple risk factors for dementia results in better outcomes than treating each factor individually. Risk factors include:

  1. Poor nutrition
  2. obesity’smoking
  3. physical inactivity
  4. cardiovascular risks
  5. depression
  6. social isolation
  7. lack of mental stimulation

Strategies to help deal with these risks have been shown to help improve cognitive performance. Just treating single variables such as high blood pressure or lack of exercise has less effect than hitting multiple factors at once. A study in Lancet Neurology (August 2014) revealed that one-third of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) cases are attributable to modifiable factors and thus AD may be reduced in prevalence by improved education , treatment of depression, and management of vascular risk factors such as physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes.

  • Get regular exercise: this reduces stress, improves blood flow to the brain, strengthens connection of neurons in the brain, improves medical health and balance, thus reducing falls. The goal is 30 minutes of aerobic activity five times a week (walking, dancing, biking as examples) and strength training twice a week.
  • Challenge your brain: Demanding brain activities utilizing different aspects of your intellect help protect against cognitive decline, making your mind more efficient and able to focus. So expose yourself to new ideas and challenges mentally, so that you can maintain your memory skills and concentration abilities. Things like cross-word puzzles, checkers or cards help build up your brain as do math problems. Research shows that staying intellectually engaged may prevent AD. These types of brain challenges add to your cognitive reserve. Social interaction also plays a role in preventing cognitive decline. It has been found that those who play more games or puzzles were more likely to perform better on test of memory, learning, and information processing. They also have greater brain volume in areas associated with memory. Mental workouts enhance brain blood flow and promote cell growth, stronger neuron connections, and keep the brain efficient. It makes the brain less sensitive to trauma such as drugs, stroke, or disease. The internet has resources to help:  http://brainworkshop.sourceforge.net/  or http://sporcle.com/  or http://syvum.com/teasers/  or http://www.braingle.com/  or http://www.billsgames.com/brain-teasers/   So consider crossword puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, word searches, math problems, an brainteasers to exercise your mind!
  • Treat mental illness, especially depression: Sadness, hopelessness, and lack of energy may signal depression. Depression is associated with a high risk of cognitive decline. See your doctor to help get treatment.
  • Eat a healthy diet: Eat complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Avoid sodas, sweets, and excess sugars. Protein is essential for growth and cell maintenance, so consider lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, low fat dairy,  nuts, and beans. Chose healthy fats such as omega-3 fatty acids found in flaxseed oil, fish, and nuts. Monounsaturated fats are also healthful and is present in olive and canola oils. Polyunsaturated fats from corn, safflower, and sunflower seeds are fine as well. Avoid trans-fats. Remember to include your micronutrients and phytochemicals (found in plant sources).
  • Treat cardiovascular risks: Stop smoking, lose weight, be physically active, treat high blood pressure and diabetes, take your prescribed medications.

Avoid Trans-fats in your diet. It is found in many junk foods, especially fast foods, processed foods, baked goods, margarine, and other sources. These products and trans-fats perform about 10% worse on cognitive tests than those who consumed minimal amounts. Trans-fats promote oxidative stress and damage the memory center of the brain, the hippocampus.

Magnesium is essential for brain functioning. It is found in green leafy vegetables, whole grains, nuts, legumes, and hard water. Magnesium helps in energy production, needed especially in the brain. It helps in the formation and release of neurotransmitters as well as functioning of connections in the brain (synapses) to process new information. Studies in Molecular Brain (September 2014) demonstrated that magnesium L-threonate (MgT) supplementation prevented memory decline and prevented synapse loss in mice prone to AD. It also reduced the deposition of beta-amyloid protein in the brain (a cause of AD) Risk factors for magnesium depletion include chronic alcoholism, diabetes, excessive coffee intake, inflammatory bowel disease such as Chrone’s disease, diuretic intake, liver and kidney disease,  and excessive soda and salt intake.The RDA is 400 mg a day – http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/  This link points to sources of magnesium for your diet. Foods included are Almonds, spinach, cashews, peanuts, shredded wheat cereal, soy milk, black beans, whole wheat bread, avocado, baked potato, brown rice, plain yogurt, and others.

This sounds dumb but avoid head injury – it has been shown that older adults who have a head injury are at higher risk of dementia, especially over the age of 65. The main reason for these injuries are falls, many of which are preventable and may be due to deconditioning and weakness from lack of exercise. Remember that exercise increases strength and balance.

Remember to not be anxious over your health – don’t become a hypochondriac. Maintain your health through proper eating, exercise, risk management of cardiovascular problems (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cessation), taking your prescribed medications, and regular physician check-ups will maximize your health. Don’t get preoccupied with health matters and fears of disease such that they interfere with your daily activities and enjoyments in life. Keep yourself busy and distracted by learning new tasks and volunteering. Consider meditation, relaxing your body and mind, concentrating on the present moment. Exercise your body to reduce stress and reduce your anxiety. This will build your physical strength and increase your feelings of well-being. Keep your head up with positive feeling and be grateful for the good things in your life and those things you can control. Don’t stress out!!

 

 

 

Insane medicine: Pregnant mothers may need to watch their fat intake during pregnancy – it may affect their children!

Insane medicine - Fat mice get fat by eating fat diets. The effect damages their progeny.
Insane medicine – Fat mice get fat by eating fat diets. The effect damages their progeny.
  • The average American diet has 37% fat content. The recommended amount is 25-35% according to the 2010 dietary guidelines. Four studies have shown the bad impact that high fat consumption during pregnancy has on the fetus.
  • Mice fed 45 % fat diets during pregnancy demonstrated deficits in memory with higher anxiety and depression scores as well! What’s worse is there was epigenetic effect as well – the following generation of mice displayed memory loss and behavioral change as well. Here is the link: http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewAbstract.aspx?mID=3527&sKey=f830412f-200d-4363-8e53-e8af37236afe&cKey=f00a8887-5be2-467f-a500-480d7b3bcac8&mKey=54c85d94-6d69-4b09-afaa-502c0e680ca7
  • A study in rats also showed that the mother’s diet, if high in saturated fat and branched chain amino acids(BCAA), would prime the microglia of their offspring. Microglia are the mmune cells of the brain and will secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus (a learning center). Also high levels of BCAA compete with tryptophan transport across the blood brain barrier. When there is less tryptophan in the brain, the brain makes less serotonin which then results in anxiety! The pups were found to have depression and anxiety scores that were much higher than pups born to mothers who ate a more fat-restricted diet. Here is the link: http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewAbstract.aspx?sKey=8d86b6b5-65d9-4dc4-9b97-53b5a5db4027&cKey=529d5e00-6f15-426c-8ee3-c9c61424e666&mKey=54c85d94-6d69-4b09-afaa-502c0e680ca7
  • Other studies demonstrated that a high fat diet in the pregnant mother causes the down-regulation of oxytocin systems in the brain of offspring and causes anxiety to be prevalant in the progeny. This effect does not occur in the pups of normal fed pregnant female rats. In this study it was found that the fewer numbers of oxytocin-positive neurons within the PVN (paraventricular nucleus), the more anxious the rats were as adults. Oxytocin projections to the brainstem acts as an appetite suppressant,  hence leading to overeating in the progeny of overfed pregnant females. Oxytocin also plays a role in maternal behaviors as well. Mother rats literally groom their daughters to be attentive or neglectful mothers themselves and this is associated with the presence of normal numbers of oxytocin projections. If a rat has fewer oxytocin projections, they will be neglectful parents more likely. Hence multiple pathways of brain function  may be affected in the young of a high-fat diet mother. Here is a link: http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/ViewAbstract.aspx?sKey=93a801db-9e49-4d58-b917-97948ec69a18&cKey=74611e5c-0fa7-4ff0-9276-b94be31da2df&mKey=54c85d94-6d69-4b09-afaa-502c0e680ca7
  • These effects also occur in primate studies as well – monkeys whose mothers are fed high fat diets have fewer dopamine projections to the nucleus accumbens ‘reward center’ of the brain. As a result, they have a reward deficiency when they eat food and don’t get satiated at a normal level of food. Rather, they  must take in more food to get the same amount of reward as another monkey that came from a normal-fed mother and had normal dopamine projections in the brain. Thus they get fatter.
  • Dietary guidelines recommend a diet of 25-27% fat. See this link for the recommendations of a standard diet:  http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/DietaryGuidelines2010.pdf  However, the average person takes in 37% fat or more!! See this link showing how much we really take in:  http://jn.nutrition.org/content/140/10/1832.long
  • We eat more than we think. We need to recognize that our food choices and stress patterns can affect our children through epigenetic mechanisms especially. We can set up our children for failure. These studies are done in standard models for humans and show the impact high fat diets in pregnancy  have on their children: Memory deficits, anxiety, depression, and future weight problems may echo the studies in rat and monkey populations.  The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, for it seems that overweight parents have overweight children. Food for thought!!
  • http://fatmouse.org/