Tag Archives: osteoarthritis

Vibrating gloves for osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis Chronic Hand Pain May Be Improved With Vibrating Gloves

Efficacy of Vibrating Gloves for Chronic Hand Pain due to Osteoarthritis

Vibrating gloves may help reduce hand pain in women with hand osteoarthritis (OA). The findings were presented at the American Pain Society’s 36th Annual Scientific Meeting held May 17-20, 2017 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.1

To study whether gloves that massage the hands via mild compression and light vibration had lasting benefit with periodic use, the researchers randomly assigned 60 women with hand OA pain to either wear the gloves for 20 minutes a day or to be monitored without the gloves, for a period of 3 months.

All participants were assessed at baseline via questionnaires, subjected to a brief quantitative sensory test (QST), and indicated their pain level on a daily basis using a smartphone app. The app reminded participants to complete daily assessments of their pain, sleep, activity interference, mood, and any perceived change. The participants also completed written questionnaires at 6 weeks and 3 months.

The researchers had potential participants try on the gloves to assess whether they would agree to wear them during the 3-month trial; 3 participants (<5%) did not want to participate after trying on the gloves.

The average age of participants was 62.7±7.7. Pain intensity averaged 4.1±1.9 on a scale of 0 to 10, and participants reported having pain for an average of 11.5±9.6 years. Most of the participants were right-handed (88.5%), and 50.0% reported primarily right hand pain.

Over time, the participants wore the gloves less often — an average of 5.2 days a week.

Compared with the control group, patients in the experimental group had reduced pain intensity (P <.05). There were no differences in mood or sleep. Individuals with greater sensitivity on the QST showed most benefit from wearing the gloves (P <.05).

 

 

Chondroiton Sulfate and Glucosamine is effective in moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis.

lo res cartilage structure copy GlucosamineCombined chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine on Knee osteoarthritis

The MOVES trial tested whether chondroitin sulfate (CS)  plus glucosamine hydrochloride (GH) has comparable
efficacy to celecoxib after 6 months of treatment in patients
with painful knee osteoarthritis.

MOVES study for Chondroiton Sulfate and GH  < LINK to study

  • The trial tested 606 patients with moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis (OA) based on a WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index) scale >301 (range is 0-500). Treatment with 400 mg of CS and 500 mg GH three times a day was compared with the effects of Celocoxib 200 mg once a day for 6 months.
  • The results: Both treatments were equally effective. For CS/GH Vs.  Celocoxib, both treatments resulted in decreasing pain by 50% as well as joint swelling.
  • In summary: Using either Celocoxib or GH/CS had equal effect in decreasing joint stiffness, pain, functional limitations, and joint swelling after 6 months in the treatment of OA of the knee.
  • Be certain to obtain your GH/CS from a trusted source which can be checked on line at Consumer Lab  or the US Pharmacopeia.
  • Side effects of Glucosamine may be an increase in glucose levels, so be careful if you are diabetic. Also if you have an allergy to shellfish, Glucosamine can be derived from materials in shellfish, so again be careful.
  • Recommended daily doses of Glucosamine is 1,500 mg ans 1,200 mg of chondroiton.
  •  Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, and the Two in Combination NEJM  GAIT trial < link to gate trial. A prior study in the New Englandd Journal of Medicine had shown results hinting that CS/GH work best in moderate-to-severe disease, but not so much is lesser OA pain.In the study discussion, it was noted:  Analysis of the prespecified subgroup of patients with moderate-to severe pain demonstrated that combination therapy significantly decreased knee pain related to osteoarthritis, as measured by the primary outcome or by the OMERACT–OARSI response rate. We did not identify significant benefits associated with the use of glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate alone. Although the results for glucosamine did not reach significance, the possibility of a positive  effect in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe pain cannot be excluded, since the difference from placebo in the OMERACT–OARSI response rate approached significance in this group. Treatment with chondroitin sulfate was associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of joint swelling, effusion, or both. We did not find an increased risk of ischemic cardiovascular events among patients who received celecoxib or among patients with diabetes who received glucosamine, but this study was not powered to assess these risks… Our finding is that the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may have some efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe symptoms.
  • Be certain to lose weight and exercise.  Obesity places huge stress on knees and ankles and hips. Supplements should complement these steps.

 

Insane Medicine – Arthritis pain and what to do:

Arthritis Pain:

 

Arthritis affects millions of individuals, reducing quality of life.  There are multiple facets that can be addressed regarding arthritis pain and what to do, but I will address several points:

  • Exercise added to the daily routine is the best way to help combat arthritis. Unused joint cause increased pain. What type of exercise? Flexibility Exercises, strength training, and aerobic exercises all help combat joint pain. They also help an individual lose weight as well, which increases mobility.
  • Range of motion exercises can help with stiffness and can improve mobility. Flexibility  exercises allow one to do this. Tai chi and yoga are examples.
  • Preserve your muscle mass with strength training at least three times a week. This also allows one to lose weight and helps maintain mobility. Muscle training helps support the joint structure and function, such as the knees. This decreases joint stress.
  • Aerobic exercises also add a lot to overall health and diminish joint pain. Swimming is low impact. Walking is another option.

Options to help arthritis pain:

  • Heat application: Relaxes the muscles and increases blood flow to affected areas, helping provide nutrients and oxygen. This is useful in multiple areas such as knee, neck, and back pain.
  • Cold Applications: Cold packs can be used acutely after exercise to decrease inflammation, muscle spasms, and pain, especially in the first 72 hours, after which, use heat.
  • Emotional support: Remember that a large challenge to arthritis is the emotional impact. Cognitive behavioral therapy is an option to help one cope with the pain of arthritis. Remember to keep busy and keep moving. Meditation can help overcome the negative emotions that can actually increase your pain. Pain can increase your anxiety and depression. Insomnia can result from arthritis pain, so the emotional impact is huge as arthritis affects so many facets in one’s life.
  • Acupuncture: This may be an option in some individuals. Consider going online to find a certified acupuncture specialist near you.
  • Spinal Manipulation Therapy (SMT): Look at the entire body and evaluate the triggers that aggravate arthritis. SMT can reduce stiffness and help with joint movement.  These changes in joint mobility have a local effect on the chemical factors that cause inflammation and pain. The joint may be the culprit in causing stiffness or the muscles surrounding the joint may be inflamed or spastic, resulting in lower mobility and pain.
  • Physical Therapy: Consult your physician for a PT referral., which can help you find ways to promote strength and flexibility.
  • Quit Smoking: Smoking lowers bone density.

Remember that muscles support your bones, and it is important to increase your muscle mass as it provides numerous benefits in addition to supporting your joints and your back. The back, in particular, with it’s discs and small facets, is affected over time by pressure, which can be unloaded by stretching and strengthening the spinal muscles through basic exercises like:

  1. Pelvic tilt exercises:

    Pelvic tilt
    Pelvic tilt
  2. One -legged wind releasing

    one legged wind releasing
    one legged wind releasing
  3. trunk lift
    trunk lift
    trunk lift

    You need core muscle strength and flexibility to help preserve your back. The hip muscles need to have flexibility maintained as well for better back health. Consider doing this through the 4.hammerstring stretch:

    hammerstring stretch
    hammerstring stretch

    Hamstring-Stretch-Sitting-WEB

  4. hamstring-stretch-seated
    hamstring-stretch-seated

    http://wellbalancedwoman.com/blog/< link to stretching blog – and alternative therapies.

  5.